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Monday, April 16, 2018

Victory Against Gender Segregation in Israel

The Israel Women's Network, a Foundation grantee, won an important court victory last week:  Israel's Labor Court ruled that the state is not allowed to hold a gender-segregated training course for civil servants.

The court accepted the IWN's position that a training program intended exclusively for male civil servants is a discriminatory practice, even if it serves an important purpose of integrating the Ultra-Orthodox population in the civil service in Israel. The court ordered that if at least 10 women will not be enrolled in the course, it will be discontinued. The IWN claimed that when the state conducts a segregated course, it accepts and institutionalizes gender segregation that cannot be accepted in a democratic state. 


IWN director and attorney Michal Gera Margaliot said the court had delivered a clear message that gender separation in civil service was prohibited.

"You cannot take us backwards by decades, and acceptance for employment cannot be done according to gender," she said. "It would be better for the state to integrate haredi men and women in the civil service and not lead toward the ejection of women from the public domain and the workforce."



 


Tuesday, April 10, 2018

She's Running for Mayor!

Galit Shaul, CEO of the Rackman Center, a Hadassah Foundation grantee, is running for mayor of the Emek Hefer Regional Council in Israel!  In an op-ed, Shaul says that she was inspired by the #MeToo movement in the US, which quickly became a social movement in Israel, too.  

The Hadassah Foundation is proud investor in programs that empower women and girls in Israel and in the United States--and is thrilled to see such a capable woman whom we have supported seek out a position of power!
 

You can read Shaul's piece (in English) here.



The Future of Feminist Funding in Israel

Hamutal Gouri, the outgoing director of the Dafna Foundation--and a long-time partner with the Hadassah Foundation--penned a must-read essay in ejewishphilanthropy.com about the future of funding for feminist activities in Israel.  She also discusses the feminist conference held in Israel last month, which was organized by Dafna and the National Council of Jewish Women, and which was attended by the Hadassah Foundation.

You can read the piece here.

Thursday, March 29, 2018

Sexual Harassment at the UN

Orit Sulitzeanu (above, center), executive director of our grantee, the Association of Rape Crisis Centers in Israel, participated in a panel at the United Nations today about sexual harassment within the U.N. itself. It was painfully clear, based on statements from U.N. personnel, that the Hadassah Foundation-supported project, to create a workable anti-sexual harassment code in the workplace, could make a real difference there.

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Snow Days...and an Extention for Tannenbaum Prize Applications

Because our office has been closed so many days over the past couple of weeks due to snow/inclement weather—and we know that so many of our friends have also experienced disruptions due to the weather—we have decided to extend the deadline for the Bernice S. Tannenbaum Prize until Tuesday, March 27, 5 pm ET, in order to accommodate those who asked for a couple of more days to complete the application.

As you may recall, the prize provides $2500 for a professional development activity (e.g. to attend a class or conference, or coaching) to an emerging professional (less than about 15 years of experience) who is working to advance the cause of Israeli women or Jewish girls and women in the United States.

The application can be downloaded here:  http://www.hadassah.org/who-we-are/foundation/#tannenbaum

A Timely Haggadah for the #MeToo Era

A year before #MeToo hit the mainstream, a program supported by the Hadassah Foundation, the Jewish United Fund of Chicago's Research Training Internship (RTI) program, created a Passover haggadah that explores sexual violence and rape culture. This year, they are aiming for the haggadah to go viral.

"The Revenge of Dinah: A Feminist Seder on Rape Culture in the Jewish Community," was compiled last year by students participating in (RTI), a 10-month paid internship that brings together a dozen high-school-aged girls from across the Chicago area to complete a project using feminist research methodologies.  Stephanie Goldfarb, who leads up the program, received the Foundation's Bernice S. Tannenbaum Prize, which is awarded annually to an emerging professional making a difference in the lives of girls and women in Israel or the United States' Jewish community.

Last year, the girls used the haggadah at seder for about 50 peers and a handful of adults.  This year, however, they feel the timing is ripe to share it with the larger Jewish community.  Download the haggadah here  and read more about the program and haggadah in this featured article in ejewishphilanthropy.com.

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Combating Violence Against Women

At the Force for Change Israel Mission today, we heard from a panel of experts who are attempting to limit violence against women.  These included the director of our former grantee, Women's Spirit, which helps female victims of domestic violence regain their economic footing, as well as Orit Sulitzeanu (above right), director of the Association of Rape Crisis Centers in Israel. The problem is particularly acute in the Israeli Arab population, which is exacerbated by the Israeli police force's inattention to the issue--80% of the so-called honor killings/femicide in the Israeli Arab community remain unsolved.